Author Topic: vacuum stabilization  (Read 1042 times)

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bilquest

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vacuum stabilization
« on: January 08, 2016, 01:50:02 PM »
I've tried several methods for stabilization including Opticon and acetone/epoxy soaking. I even made a little vacuum out of a pickle jar and a Harbor Freight brake bleeder. It kinda worked in that I could see bubbles fizzing out of the stone. The problem was that to maintain vacuum I had to keep pumping which grew tiresome in a hurry. (You'd be surprised at how much air can be in a seemingly solid stone.)

So, I was wondering if anyone here has tried one of these gizmos?

http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00LXH1NZ0/ref=dra_a_cs_lr_hn_xx_P1400_1000?tag=dradisplay-20&ascsubtag=b4cdffcb8b566f4efa77f3984677fa53_S

I've got some killer Chrysocolla (and other porous stone) that I would like to suck some epoxy into... and I'm not quite sure about dropping two bills for an apparatus that might only add further clutter to the shop.

dickb

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Re: vacuum stabilization
« Reply #1 on: January 08, 2016, 02:14:16 PM »
You can get by cheaper than that, although that will work fine.

Look at vacuum pumps and aspirators on ebay.

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Contemporary-Products-Aspirator-Vacuum-Pump-Model-6260-/301823034217?hash=item46460e0369:g:7usAAOSwys5WT8Xz

Good luck.

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jakesrocks

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Re: vacuum stabilization
« Reply #2 on: January 08, 2016, 02:41:19 PM »
A day spent without learning something new, is a day wasted.

Don


light house jack

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Re: vacuum stabilization
« Reply #3 on: January 08, 2016, 04:50:18 PM »
I suggest that you watch the video on the website of HIS GLASS WORKS in Asheville, NC. They show how do the process with HXTAL which is the epoxy that museums around the world use as it is the most archival and never yellows.  I went there and watched the process and came home and made my own vacuum pump using the Harbor Freight hand brake pump and a mason jar which with the hose and connector which is about a $30.00 solution. When I pump it up and start seeing the bubbles coming from the rock, I cannot say that I loose vacuum for quite a while. If you are loosing vacuum, I would check to make sure that the connector in the lid of the mason jar is sealed totally.

PhilNM

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Re: vacuum stabilization
« Reply #4 on: January 09, 2016, 09:18:30 AM »
I bought and successfully used this system to stabilize many pounds of turquoise. Recently sold it and it was still working as good as the day I bought it.
http://www.bestvaluevacs.com/5gvackit.html

PhilNM

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Re: vacuum stabilization
« Reply #5 on: January 09, 2016, 09:25:46 AM »
I suggest that you watch the video on the website of HIS GLASS WORKS in Asheville, NC. They show how do the process with HXTAL which is the epoxy that museums around the world use as it is the most archival and never yellows.  I went there and watched the process and came home and made my own vacuum pump using the Harbor Freight hand brake pump and a mason jar which with the hose and connector which is about a $30.00 solution. When I pump it up and start seeing the bubbles coming from the rock, I cannot say that I loose vacuum for quite a while. If you are loosing vacuum, I would check to make sure that the connector in the lid of the mason jar is sealed totally.

Jack, Tried to find that video, found many other but not that one. Got an URL?

Thanks!

bobby1

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Re: vacuum stabilization
« Reply #6 on: January 09, 2016, 10:47:44 AM »
In my efforts at stabilizing or fracture sealing with a vacuum pump I found that, at least in my experience, the vacuum was so significant that what I saw as bubbles coming from the fractures was actually the epoxy boiling and causing the bubbles. I'm using an industrial vacuum pump that probably works too well.
Bob

PhilNM

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Re: vacuum stabilization
« Reply #7 on: January 10, 2016, 04:32:04 PM »
In my efforts at stabilizing or fracture sealing with a vacuum pump I found that, at least in my experience, the vacuum was so significant that what I saw as bubbles coming from the fractures was actually the epoxy boiling and causing the bubbles. I'm using an industrial vacuum pump that probably works too well.
Bob
If your material wasn't completely dry, those bubbles could be caused by water breaking down, which will go on forever.

bobby1

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Re: vacuum stabilization
« Reply #8 on: January 10, 2016, 06:58:50 PM »
Actually I heat the piece under a 100 watt bench lamp until it is too hot to touch, then I place it in an aluminum muffin pan with Opticon and heat it again to make the Opticon thin and watery so it will penetrate better.  All of this heat definitely drives off all the water. I let it cool a somewhat to minimize the probability of the Opticon boiling under vacuum but it still does.
Bob

vitzitziltecpatl

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Re: vacuum stabilization
« Reply #9 on: January 10, 2016, 07:31:47 PM »
All the first-hand comments of vacuum setups is great. We have a pile of things we want to throw into a jar one of these days. Thanks!