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Congratulations to denverkris and her Stinking Water Plume Agate Cab!

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Another cabochon contest coming soon!

Pages: [1] 2 3 ... 10
 1 
 on: December 10, 2018, 09:07:52 PM 
Started by denverkris - Last post by lithicbeads
Is it petrified wood? From what location?

 2 
 on: December 10, 2018, 06:26:51 PM 
Started by VegasJames - Last post by VegasJames
   Names...  arrrgh.   Cases in point, Graveyard Point plume agate. Morrisonite as well. Many miners, myself included, used the name of their claim for the Plume Agate they dug at Graveyard Point. Several reasons. Too damn much crappy agate was mined and sold under the name GPP agate. Others simply wanted to scream "new discovery" even though every hill out there has been dug on for 50 years.
   Morrisonite is just the opposite. Anything that looks like Morrisonite and came from that area was sold as Morrisonite to draw more money. Owyhee Picture jasper from the Original claim was beautiful. Now, too many people use the damn name on any piece of crap from the Owyhee Mountain region to get hits on the internet.
   Philly did a great job marketing Dead Camel. What great tales....   Now it is far more recognized than the original jaspers from that area.
Human Nature can be .......  be careful out there.

In some cases I can see this, such as with turquoise since it can vary so much.

But as I pointed out in my last post do we really need to come up with new names for the same exact obsidians and unakite found in different parts of the U.S. or world? Or should the same stone with the same chemical makeup and other characteristics have the same name regardless of where is was obtained?  For example, let's say two mines with different owners and different names right next to each other mine the same exact type, color and other characteristics of jasper does the jasper get different names even though they are identical?

And you bring up quality. So here is another question. Most of the Sleeping Beauty turquoise originally mined was high quality. As they continued mining the quality of the turquoise decreased. So does that mean the lower quality turquoise from the same exact mine is no longer Sleeping Beauty turquoise?

 3 
 on: December 10, 2018, 06:18:04 PM 
Started by lapidaryrough - Last post by hummingbirdstones
Very pretty!  Amy sage is one of my favorite materials.

 4 
 on: December 10, 2018, 06:17:38 PM 
Started by VegasJames - Last post by VegasJames
I have heard via some very loud instagram conversations between the 'dead ringer' and 'dead camel' fans that 'Dead Camel' comes from that specific claim, and everything else comes from other claims on Dead Camel mt but with other names to differentiate whose it is.

At the end of the day it's both a pretty material and an interesting case study into the social impact of rockhound naming conventions.

In that case since I found three different types of stone in the area all not on any claims that would mean I would have to come up with three totally new names, two for the same material found elsewhere on the mountain. That is totally ridiculous.

Personally I'm a fan of ridiculously specific different names because they give a better understanding of the material's origin spot than broad locale names. Had a lot of years to stew over the problem of "but where in the hundred-plus-square-mile area by that name did this specific rock come from?" Back to the DC jasper, from the tone of the conversation it seemed to impact perception of who had rights to what material more than who had rights to give things new names, and trickled down into marketing strategy. I can't say who was wrong/right in all that, just that it was observed, and I found it interesting. How big of a geographic area is Dead Camel?

It is a small mountain range around 10 miles long. And the material is not going to be in every part of the mountain. So it is actually a relatively small area.

The Cady's are larger and we don't see people coming up with new names for the same material found in each part of the Cady's.

Or what about obsidian? Do we rename black obsidian after every little area is is found or come up with a bunch of sales names to confuse people making it sound like something different? Black knight obsidian, midnight obsidian, lights out obsidian, ...............  See how ridiculous this would be?

Mahogany obsidian can be found in the United States such as in Oregon. Yet I found my first piece in Iceland. So should I give the Icelandic mahogany obsidian a different unheard of name just because it was found in a different location than the U.S. deposit?

How about unakite, which is found in places all across the U.S. How many new marketing names need to be made up for every location and sublocation of  unakite across the U.S.?  How much confusion will coming up with over 100 new names for unakite be for people?

 5 
 on: December 10, 2018, 06:15:57 PM 
Started by 55fossil - Last post by hummingbirdstones
Wish I could tell you, but I have no idea.  It's a gorgeous cab, though!

 6 
 on: December 10, 2018, 06:12:16 PM 
Started by denverkris - Last post by hummingbirdstones
Nice cab!  That colla wood is awesome stuff, but a bit too expensive for my blood.

 7 
 on: December 10, 2018, 04:50:09 PM 
Started by denverkris - Last post by 55fossil
    Very pretty, the colors really work well together.

 8 
 on: December 10, 2018, 04:47:00 PM 
Started by VegasJames - Last post by 55fossil
   Names...  arrrgh.   Cases in point, Graveyard Point plume agate. Morrisonite as well. Many miners, myself included, used the name of their claim for the Plume Agate they dug at Graveyard Point. Several reasons. Too damn much crappy agate was mined and sold under the name GPP agate. Others simply wanted to scream "new discovery" even though every hill out there has been dug on for 50 years.
   Morrisonite is just the opposite. Anything that looks like Morrisonite and came from that area was sold as Morrisonite to draw more money. Owyhee Picture jasper from the Original claim was beautiful. Now, too many people use the damn name on any piece of crap from the Owyhee Mountain region to get hits on the internet.
   Philly did a great job marketing Dead Camel. What great tales....   Now it is far more recognized than the original jaspers from that area.
Human Nature can be .......  be careful out there.

 9 
 on: December 10, 2018, 04:43:10 PM 
Started by lithicbeads - Last post by lithicbeads
I have been using them for 30 years.They are hard on your body because if you  spend the amount they cost you have to justify the expenditure by drilling and soldering new bits on and drilling.

 10 
 on: December 10, 2018, 04:34:30 PM 
Started by VegasJames - Last post by Kaljaia
I have heard via some very loud instagram conversations between the 'dead ringer' and 'dead camel' fans that 'Dead Camel' comes from that specific claim, and everything else comes from other claims on Dead Camel mt but with other names to differentiate whose it is.

At the end of the day it's both a pretty material and an interesting case study into the social impact of rockhound naming conventions.

In that case since I found three different types of stone in the area all not on any claims that would mean I would have to come up with three totally new names, two for the same material found elsewhere on the mountain. That is totally ridiculous.

Personally I'm a fan of ridiculously specific different names because they give a better understanding of the material's origin spot than broad locale names. Had a lot of years to stew over the problem of "but where in the hundred-plus-square-mile area by that name did this specific rock come from?" Back to the DC jasper, from the tone of the conversation it seemed to impact perception of who had rights to what material more than who had rights to give things new names, and trickled down into marketing strategy. I can't say who was wrong/right in all that, just that it was observed, and I found it interesting. How big of a geographic area is Dead Camel?

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