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Author Topic: Central Oregon  (Read 281 times)

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grahamtimmer

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Central Oregon
« on: July 22, 2017, 12:15:00 AM »

Hi all! I'm heading down the OR coast to rock hound next week. My wife, son and I love getting out and looking for agates. I really like river/creek walks and beach walks. I'm from North Vancouver BC and would love a few tips if you all are willing. All my best,


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lithicbeads

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Re: Central Oregon
« Reply #1 on: July 22, 2017, 11:08:03 AM »

Collecting is much better in winter when the sand is pulled off the beaches and the gravel gets turned over.Not very helpful but don't judge a spots collecting potential by what you find in it's very picked over summer state.As important as the beach agates demand  the sun low in the sky to find them easily. Early and late in the day the agates on the beach can just glow making them very easy to find .
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rocks2dust

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Re: Central Oregon
« Reply #2 on: July 22, 2017, 07:42:52 PM »

Yes, sand does pile up in some areas until washed off by a storm. Generally, look for gravel bars at the streams that empty into the ocean. There are coves where agate, pet. wood and jasper cobbles pile up along the shore, and I'd suggest getting an Oregon rockhounding guidebook that includes GPS coordinates (such as Johnson's Rockhounding Oregon) when looking for those places. Many Oregon bookstores carry them. Watch out for and stay away from those dangerous (killer) logs along the shore, sneaker waves, and the tide quickly rolling in if you don't have an easy way to get off the beach where you are collecting. Know how to escape a rip current (by swimming parallel to the shore, not directly back toward the beach), just in case you get pulled out.

lithicbeads

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Re: Central Oregon
« Reply #3 on: July 22, 2017, 09:08:13 PM »

Quite a lot of people are killed in Oregon by sneaker or rogue waves. It is a real threat for beach goers. These waves can be multiple times the size of the average wave of the time.Near the waters edge don't turn your back. I got nailed fishing at night . I was waist deep for the average wave when the moonless night got even darker. A wall of water fell on me knocking me flat. I swam in the ocean a lot at the time and had no trouble but if a strong longshore current had been running I would have been moved enough to get disoriented and then who knows. Many very tragic stories on that coast of multiple rescuers dying also. Be careful. The stream locations are a fantastic idea as they transport the rocks from the basalt hills.
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grahamtimmer

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Re: Central Oregon
« Reply #4 on: July 22, 2017, 10:07:33 PM »

Thanks. We will be careful. I'm really interested in the creeks. I grew up with a creek in my backyard and love exploring fresh waterways.  I will look into one of those books.


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