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Author Topic: cutting oil  (Read 759 times)

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55fossil

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Re: cutting oil
« Reply #15 on: July 08, 2017, 02:04:24 PM »

   There was a guy selling an herbal supplement that was 82. His father was 102 and in good health. Sounds great but he only started using it 10 years earlier.

You can make anything sound good so use common sense. If you want to use cheap oil that has been known to cause health problems then take extra precautions. Well ventilated room, gloves and a mask for starters. If you want to take chances that is your choice, we are all free people. But telling people who are new to lapidary not to worry is probably not a good idea. I still have friends over 60 who have used Mercury for gold mining many years. Not sure if they were always crazy but they are not all that healthy either.

PS:    I paid to have ALS Minerals do a thorough test on the new Ocean Breeze Jasper.
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montanajohn

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Re: cutting oil
« Reply #16 on: July 08, 2017, 03:27:47 PM »

  Has anyone seen any written data on oils, fuels, etc from knowledgeable sources, that might indicate what is and is not dangerous to our health?
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lapidaryrough

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Re: cutting oil
« Reply #17 on: July 08, 2017, 03:48:22 PM »

only list out their is  the standard,  M.S.D.S.  ( Material, Safety, Data, Sheet, ) 


      https://www.msdsonline.com/msds-search

  Jack
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edgarscale

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Re: cutting oil
« Reply #18 on: July 08, 2017, 07:26:31 PM »

i paid $20 for a gallon name brand lapidary oil.  don't know what's in it, it doesn't say what the oil is.  i'm told stay away from transmission oil since you cannot guarantee what's in it.  even told to stay away from mineral oil too.  just told it's mist is not healthy.  i figure that if your going to use any oil do the research.  if unsure don't buy or use it until you do know.  there will always be people telling you what they think is good or not.  do the research and always always keep safety i mind. 
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irockhound

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Re: cutting oil
« Reply #19 on: July 08, 2017, 07:46:21 PM »

The part about mist being unhealthy.  Taking any sort of mist (maybe exception is natural water mist) or dust into your lungs is unhealthy.  Of course the more toxic the mist the more dangerous.  It is best to wear a mask at minimum and respirator is better if dealing with any oil mists, it all comes down to the particulate size of mist and whether the mask filters that size. Common filter such as 3m N95 masks are for dusts and may filter some bacteria however some oil mists are finer than that.  Good ventilation in your work area is essential also.
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montanajohn

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Re: cutting oil
« Reply #20 on: July 09, 2017, 06:18:17 AM »

  Thank you all for the good advice.  It is obvious we all have opinions of what oils or fuel works best for us as individuals but I have gleaned from your comments that I need to start using mask and gloves.  I assume letting the saw sit a bit after a cut should minimize the mist?
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irockhound

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Re: cutting oil
« Reply #21 on: July 09, 2017, 12:49:16 PM »

This was a work around in my small 3rd car garage turned rock shop.  I bought a wall mounted exhaust fan (not the same as ceiling exhaust for bathrooms - they are will not work vertically) which sucks the air out of the space above the saws.  I then mounted some curtain rods hanging down from the ceiling around the saw and then hung the clear plastic shower curtains around the saws.  I just slide them back when getting to the saws and leave them closed with the exhaust fan on while cutting.  Not the most elegant situation but it helps.  My friend put his saw on wheels and rolls it into the driveway when cutting.  I put in some pics to show the hacked setup but for a small space it helps.  The exhaust vent on the outside of the garage is a spring loaded louvre that only opens when the fan is running to keep down the chance of getting mice etc inside garage,
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edgarscale

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Re: cutting oil
« Reply #22 on: July 09, 2017, 07:59:50 PM »

that's a very nice set up you have there
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Steve Ramsdell

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Re: cutting oil
« Reply #23 on: October 12, 2017, 04:43:27 PM »

Some of those transformers have been on the pole a long time.  But they supposedly stopped in 1977. For myself, I use Almag which has worked well for me for decades.
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Barclay

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Re: cutting oil
« Reply #24 on: October 12, 2017, 08:42:39 PM »

  Has anyone seen any written data on oils, fuels, etc from knowledgeable sources, that might indicate what is and is not dangerous to our health?

A current safety data sheet (SDS) from the material manufacturer will give you some of data you are looking for, but it has to be for the exact product.  All motor oils are not created equal.  The other limitation is that the manufacturer gives advice based on the intended use of the product.  For example if the manufacturer thinks his hydraulic oil is going to be in a tank or in hoses where people cannot breathe the mist his is probably not going to talk about respiratory protection much.  A challenge with used transformer oil is how well did they clean out the old PCB containing transformer before they put new oil in?  Did they mix any back at the shop before the put it in the tank?  There are still many PCB transformers out there today.  A lot of companies are not changing them out until they fail.
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Rockoteer

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Re: cutting oil
« Reply #25 on: October 13, 2017, 09:00:54 PM »

Some of those transformers have been on the pole a long time.  But they supposedly stopped in 1977. For myself, I use Almag which has worked well for me for decades.
I don't understand why someone would take such a risk..?
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Steve Ramsdell

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Re: cutting oil
« Reply #26 on: October 13, 2017, 09:50:05 PM »

I don't know why they risk it.  I've had one friend use transformer oil and end up with rashes up and down his arms.  When he went back to Almag everything cleared up.  Free sometimes has a huge cost.  I can remember as a kid that they used to hand out free 4 packs of cigarettes to kids leaving HS.
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Kaljaia

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Re: cutting oil
« Reply #27 on: October 14, 2017, 08:19:43 AM »

Still using horse laxative mineral oil here. I work outside so I can stand well back from the drop saw when it's working. I do get splattered but this stuff is supposed to be pretty safe to get on your skin. If it's approved for use with livestock, it's usually alright (generally speaking. I'm talking soap, mineral oil, etc. not the hormones/supplements. Don't touch those.) There isn't any way to do anything with livestock without risking getting covered in whatever you're working with. That said, there are new recommendations that the vapor not be breathed if at all possible. The quantity I would be exposed to, standing 10 feet away outside, is probably nil, but if I get interior space I'll be making one of those fancy shower curtain surrounds real quick.



Question tho- cross-contamination between saw and cabbing machine? I get trace amounts of oil in my cabbing water sometimes. Is this to be avoided at all costs, or just an unavoidable part of the process? Is there any risk to the wheels and machine from getting oil in the water on occasion?
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- Erika

I rock hunt in the Antelope/Ashwood area of the John Day river basin in Oregon. 90% of what I post is from this area, from private property where I have permission to hike and collect. The material I find is for personal use only, I do not have landowner permission to sell. Thanks for understanding!

Steve Ramsdell

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Re: cutting oil
« Reply #28 on: October 14, 2017, 08:45:00 AM »

I have no experience with the laxative mineral oil.  But I do use Almag which is close to Pella, which is close in oder to what Rio sells as cutting oil.  I use it in all saws from  20 inch down to 4 inch.  When cutting oil got real expensive, I added ballast rocks in the side of slab saws.  That is when most people started trying alternatives.  They tried everything from transformer oil, to citrus oil.  But the blade manufacturers still recommended cutting oil.  So did the large saw makers.  If you are going to spend near 4 grand on a 20 inch saw, you can spring for the oil (especially where your health is concerned). But the only reason I use water in a saw is if the material I am cutting is very porous (like untreated turquoise). I use regular dish soap to remove oil and have no problems if I use warm water.
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Stonemon

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Re: cutting oil
« Reply #29 on: October 14, 2017, 09:28:43 AM »

I run the horse laxative in my 24" and my 12" slab saws. I get a bit of mist with the 12"... it is a Lortone ls12 and feeds a little fast for some of the tougher stones  I usually just let it sit for a bit after the cut and the mist settles and does not get into my shop. I am with Irouckhound, any foreign material that gets into the lungs is not good.
That being said, many of us have spent our working lives breathing dust, fumes and many other toxic substances and are still ticking along.
Bottom line for me is minimize exposure, keep things cleaned up and most importantly, have fun!
Bill
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Bill
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