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Author Topic: Turkish purple jade  (Read 464 times)

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finegemdesigns

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Re: Turkish purple jade
« Reply #15 on: August 02, 2017, 09:56:27 AM »

I have also heard between 40%-60% jadeite. Also I have tested the SG (specific gravity) as 2.90.
Jadeite is typically in the 3.30-3.40 range.
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jerrysg

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Re: Turkish purple jade
« Reply #16 on: August 02, 2017, 04:04:07 PM »

It's a rock composed mainly of quartz, jadeite in varying quantities, cinnabar and aegerine.  Here's a GIA analysis from Gems & Gemology that discusses it:

https://www.gia.edu/gems-gemology/FA13-LN-purple-jadeite

With cinnabar (mercury sulfide) present, (even though it is in very small quantities based on the photomicrograph) should we be concerned about mercury when working this stone?  None of the papers that I have looked at give concentrations of the various components.

One of the people working in the cab lab I supervised yesterday was working some small cabs of this material. Our air movement is not the best but the club is working to correct this.

Jerry
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finegemdesigns

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Re: Turkish purple jade
« Reply #17 on: August 06, 2017, 04:55:37 PM »

Note re:jerrysg: This (as is the case with most every other stone with these types of minerals) is usually only an issue when cutting or polishing. And this is usually only a concern if tiny particles become airborne and are inhaled. In the vast majority of cases finished stones are considered INERT with regards to their minerals and are usually safe to wear. When cutting these rocks though it is recommended that the cutter use water and wear a mask if working a rock like myrickite that contains cinnabar. This is the first I've heard of the Turkish purple jade having cinnabar so I'm guessing it is a very minute percentage.
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lithicbeads

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Re: Turkish purple jade
« Reply #18 on: August 06, 2017, 09:19:59 PM »

 In the US we have lots of mercury in all bodies of water that is then bio accumulated by organisms making the apex predators , fish  which we eat , quite mercury laden with some being worse than other species and the fat and skin of fish  the most concentrated sources of mercury. Coal has enough mercury to have spread it throughout the continent because we burn it. The amounts in those stones  using normal precautions seem to be much less risky. We have a beautiful green calcedony in one spot here in Washington that assays up to 1 % mercury and I would not touch  a stone with those levels.
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