Lapidaryforum.net

Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
Advanced search  

News:

Welcome new members & old from the Lapidary/Gemstone Community Forum. Please join up. You will be approved after spam check & you must manually activate your acct with the link in your email

Congratulations to Stonemon and his White Plume Agate and Sandsave and his Coprolite!

 www.lapidaryforum.net

Another cabochon contest coming soon!

Pages: [1]   Go Down

Author Topic: Soldering Torch Set Up  (Read 1778 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

olgguy

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 329
Soldering Torch Set Up
« on: August 01, 2016, 01:45:29 PM »

On my bench I use Natural Gas and Oxygen. I have it set up for two torches. A Meco Miget and a mini torch for delicate work. Also have an acetylene that I use for casting with a Prest-O-Lite with a #5 tip.
Logged


bobby1

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 169
Re: Soldering Torch Set Up
« Reply #1 on: August 01, 2016, 07:22:47 PM »

I use oxy acetylene for my metal soldering because the flame burns so much higher than any other gas. This allows me to use a smaller flame to get the job done. I use an air acetylene torch for casting because there is much less oxygen in the flame. Molten silver loves to absorb oxygen which comes out of solution in the flask and causes porosity in the casting.
Bob
Logged

olgguy

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 329
Re: Soldering Torch Set Up
« Reply #2 on: August 01, 2016, 07:55:17 PM »

Yes the Acetylene Oxy combination is hot as it is used for welding and cutting steel. The one drawback with Acetylene is normally you ignite it first which gives off a black smoke that floats in the air before the Oxy kicks in. And you are right about casting absorbing Oxy and causing porosity. I have seen Oxy and Propane used for casting too. We as studio metalsmiths are kind of confined to these options, where as large commercial operations can afford the exotic machines. I am using centrifugal casting which requires torch. There are others who use vacuum for casting and electric melting pots for the metal.
Logged

gemfeller

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 406
    • Art Cut Gems
Re: Soldering Torch Set Up
« Reply #3 on: August 01, 2016, 10:38:04 PM »

I use oxy-propane for torch-melting and while it's a bit slower to heat than oxy-acetylene I find it's a little easier to judge the right melt temperature.  I used to use acetylene but had as many problems with overheated metal as with porosity.  I also hate all the acetylene soot.  I've done castings with both vacuum and centrifuge but tend to use my centrifuge almost exclusively now.  My vacuum set-up was a little wonky and didn't use perforated flasks like the newer machines, so the seal between flask and seat was a little "iffy."  Castings with it weren't as dense as with the centrifuge.

It's been a while since I did much casting but I'm planning to do more soon.  There are some new digital melting ovens on the market that are more affordable than the standard Kerr units and I'm seriously thinking of investing in one.  Open torch melting has always seemed like a gamble to me due to all the problems and it would be nice to know metal is at the correct temp and unoxidized when it's time to pour.
Logged

bobby1

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 169
Re: Soldering Torch Set Up
« Reply #4 on: August 02, 2016, 09:14:01 AM »

I find that if I open the oxygen valve slightly and then the acetylene that when the flame lights it is soot-free. It takes a little practice to get the oxygen valve at the right setting at first but it works.  With the air acetylene torches the flame mixture is always correct when you light the torch so there is no soot.
Bob
 
Logged

womanwithatorch

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 51
Re: Soldering Torch Set Up
« Reply #5 on: August 02, 2016, 09:48:27 AM »

Olguy, you didn't say when you choose the Meco midget over the smith little torch. I am curious because I bought a used setup just like this (except with propane). I use the little torch almost exclusively.  At first I experimented with the meco but never figured out which situations its better for. The person who set it up was known for his intricate channel inlay work. I was told he used hypodermic needles as torch tips at times, I think with the meco, which I've also been curious about.
Can you share any insight?

I would not use either of these for casting.
Logged
"I am always doing that which I cannot do, in order that I might learn how to do it." Pablo Picasso

bobby1

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 169
Re: Soldering Torch Set Up
« Reply #6 on: August 02, 2016, 10:07:00 AM »

I use the little torch exclusively because it works for delicate pieces as well as larger ones. Its mostly about what you first learned on. On school we use the Meco midget but mi found it to be awkward to hold and manipulate.
Bob
Logged

olgguy

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 329
Re: Soldering Torch Set Up
« Reply #7 on: August 02, 2016, 11:00:14 AM »

I primarily use the Meco for Cabochon bezel type work. The Little torch is used for finer work as jump rings and chain repair. For casting I use the Prest-O-Lite internal mix air and Acetylene with a large #5 tip.
On the Meco I use mostly the N-1 tip which is the center one pictured, The needle tip on the right is an NJ 4o and is comparable to some of the Little torch tips.The left hand tip is a N-6. And on the Little torch I use their #5 tip. There are little tricks you can use with larger tips such as using pieces of steel banding strap to block the flame from areas that might melt while soldering close to a thin area.
Logged
Pages: [1]   Go Up
 

Page created in 0.078 seconds with 35 queries.