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Author Topic: What are the most dangerous hazards in this hobby...  (Read 12780 times)

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PhilNM

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Re: What are the most dangerous hazards in this hobby...
« Reply #30 on: January 24, 2018, 04:43:40 PM »

teaching idiots who plug in and turn on equipment when you're not looking and working on repairs....  or just as bad, leave them running and walk away.....
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lapidaryrough

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Re: What are the most dangerous hazards in this hobby...
« Reply #31 on: January 25, 2018, 06:07:14 PM »

Lack of life training,  to play out side of the house.
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Silicate life form

Phishisgroovin

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Re: What are the most dangerous hazards in this hobby...
« Reply #32 on: January 25, 2018, 08:17:32 PM »

What are the most dangerous hazards in this hobby...????????

Going to the lapidary store with money (kidding)

Thin thin saw blades....
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Redrummd

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Re: What are the most dangerous hazards in this hobby...
« Reply #33 on: January 25, 2018, 11:09:37 PM »

In my studio - knives are a real danger!   Almost took off a finger one time and most weeks have a nick or more - usually from metal polishing....

Steve Ramsdell

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Re: What are the most dangerous hazards in this hobby...
« Reply #34 on: March 08, 2018, 06:24:36 PM »

My all time favorite was free oil given out by electric utility companies.  I saw a lot of people get a pretty fast reaction when they used the oil in slab and trim saws.  It was due to PCBs in the oil.  They no longer use this stuff.  But some of the oil is still in transformers on poles.  They don't replace unless they have to.
Steve
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Sandsave

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Re: What are the most dangerous hazards in this hobby...
« Reply #35 on: March 11, 2018, 06:33:02 PM »

I'm with Neal I'm cutting a piece of Chrysotile from quartzite, if I haven't worked the material before I check it out on line before hand, a lot lately since I picked up a bunch of new material to me.
This is nasty stuff, I've kept it completely covered with oil or water and use a respirator when cutting with water on my preform stage.
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Jhon P

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Re: What are the most dangerous hazards in this hobby...
« Reply #36 on: March 11, 2018, 06:44:42 PM »

After thinking about it I remember looking at the chrysotile when we were at Quartzsite and I decided I didn’t want to risk it
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finegemdesigns

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Re: What are the most dangerous hazards in this hobby...
« Reply #37 on: March 12, 2018, 03:50:51 PM »

Small metal circular saw blades on Foredom or Dremel handpieces. These dangerous little suckers have teeth just like the big boys and will rip jagged slices out of your fingers if you aren't excessively careful.

 :dontknow: :dontknow: :icon_scratch: :nono:
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R.U. Sirius

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Re: What are the most dangerous hazards in this hobby...
« Reply #38 on: September 01, 2021, 10:14:51 PM »

Reviving this old thread to add some important details about the dangers of oil mist when operating saws. I observed over time a significant portion of members of our local club who didn't seem to be aware of the risk of lipoid pneumonia - inflamation of lung tissue due to accumulation of oils. Shortness of breath, chest pain, cough, and general malaise are some of the typical symptoms. Chronic exposure may lead to lasting damage.

Note that this condition is in addition to the added danger from silica particles that oil mist is carrying, or to any toxic or carcinogenic effects some oils may present (transformer oils some rockhounds reportedly use, or traces of aromatic components in impure mineral oils, smoke). Inhaling the mist of even the pure, FDA-grade mineral oil is damaging in itself.

To control the risk, avoid oils that create lots of mist (unfortunately these are often the low viscosity oils that are desirable from the mechanical standpoint).

Make sure the lid closes properly, and keep it closed for a few minutes after stopping the saw.

Know your respirator or mask: p95 rating, for example, indicates resistance to oil mist, whereas n95 material would suffer from degraded performance when exposed to oil.

Ensure adequate ventilation. If you have to reach into a cloud of oil mist, at least learn to control your breath for those few moments.

Ensure adequate lighting, so you can notice the problem if it is there. Oily surfaces around your saw are also a good indicator that you have a problem.

Try reducing the spinning rate of the saw, especially for larger-diameter blades, toward the minimum of the recommended operating range.

Learn to distinguish between the smoke and the mist - both are bad for your health, but are caused by different mechanisms, and require different remediation strategies. (Speaking of smoke, a handheld thermal camera is one of the best investments for anyone operating machinery - you can easily identify a number of problems with wiring, motors, v-belts, bearings, and blades).
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