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Author Topic: What materials to use for rehab rusty machines  (Read 630 times)

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Johnboy5550

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What materials to use for rehab rusty machines
« on: May 16, 2018, 12:54:23 PM »

Hey Guys,
I'm new to the forum as well as to the allure of turning a rough rock into something beautiful.
 
This is a retirement community and they have very nice workshops for the residents to use. Very large and Well equipped. Lapidary, stained & fused glass, art, jewelry making, sculpture etc.

Anyway I would like to take on the project of refurbing some of the equipment that has become rusted and deeply pitted.
What I am wondering about what paint (or coatings) I should use to refinish the equipment after cleaning up the metal. (Let me preface that I have been a professional handyman for over 40 years). I have done a lot of repairs over the years but nothing that had this much water constantly on it.

I've got numerous "ideas" but what I'm asking is if there is something KNOWN out there that would be the best coating to stand up to the torture these machines are subject to. There are a couple of horizontal laps (one a 24" machine) and 2 belt sanders (for glass).

If you've done this and the coating has truly lasted please let me know. I would feel bad putting all the work in, sanding, sandblasting etc., and then have it all coming up within the year.
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lithicbeads

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Re: What materials to use for rehab rusty machines
« Reply #1 on: May 16, 2018, 01:35:05 PM »

In my experience a fair amount of the deterioration  these machines experience is due to poor storage or abandonment. Friends rehabbed many such machines at my place last year as they were abandoned  and
I picked them up.Thorough cleaning and prep  and painting using standard rust prevention paint works great on the sheet metal. A lot of elbow grease  on the mechanical part and lots of replacement of parts. Most were abandoned because they were not working properly so one can often expect a serious underlying issue
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PhilNM

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Re: What materials to use for rehab rusty machines
« Reply #2 on: May 16, 2018, 04:43:37 PM »

I've successsfully used paint on truck bed liner, but you'll need to clean clean clean the surface first. Once on, lasts forever. Outside can be any exterior enamel or even powder coat.
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Mud

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Re: What materials to use for rehab rusty machines
« Reply #3 on: May 16, 2018, 08:37:59 PM »

I recently sprayed Majic Tractor, Truck, and Implement Enamel over Majic Rust Preventative Sandable Primer on a couple of arbors and a trim saw.  It was in stock locally and the color I needed for another project.  It looks good so far, reviews are good, and I've seen multiple references to using it for topside boat paint.

This ran me $25 for paint (gal.) and $16 for primer (qt.).  One of the better paints in its price range.
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Johnboy5550

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Re: What materials to use for rehab rusty machines
« Reply #4 on: May 16, 2018, 09:45:28 PM »

Thanks for posts.
Actually my first thought was for truck bed liner since the parts that are the worse are the water trays. Since the water sits there for a while until it drains out, I thought that the thick rubberized coating would work the best. Don't shake your heads but I also thought about that new stuff that the guy on TV sprays on a screen door and uses it in the bottom of a boat!

I'm going to sand down, and maybe chemically treat and prime the rusted sheet metal. Probably sand blast the water trays since they are so deeply pitted. My thoughts are using high end Rustoleum on the sheet metal and the thick coating on the trays.

Hey Mud...this is South Orange county CA.
I think any tractors around here have to be made by Mercedes or Range Rover.  Trying to find a Farm & Fleet would be almost impossible  here. :-)

 
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Slabbercabber

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Re: What materials to use for rehab rusty machines
« Reply #5 on: May 17, 2018, 05:22:29 AM »


Tractor paint would be my first thought as well.  It is way tougher than normal rattle can paint.  I would not use the spray can liner.  It requires an anchor and will not adhere well to clean sheet metal.  Ask any air conditioner repairman.  They all seem to have tried it.
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Greg Hiller

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Re: What materials to use for rehab rusty machines
« Reply #6 on: May 23, 2018, 01:24:39 PM »

I recently took pieces of acrylic sheet that I had and just cut them to fit in the existing tray and then silicone glued the seams to make it water tight. 
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Craigab

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Re: What materials to use for rehab rusty machines
« Reply #7 on: May 25, 2018, 07:16:20 PM »

Use Lexane rather then plexiglass if you are adding waterproof trays. Sold in same section of home depot. Stiffer, thinner but more resistant to flex, less likely to scratch and unbreakable.
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Slabbercabber

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Re: What materials to use for rehab rusty machines
« Reply #8 on: May 26, 2018, 05:48:28 AM »

If you can, the best prep is degrease and sandblast.  I've had very good results with Van Sickle tractor paint over high quality primer. 
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PhilNM

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Re: What materials to use for rehab rusty machines
« Reply #9 on: May 27, 2018, 09:26:24 AM »

pics?
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Johnboy5550

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Re: What materials to use for rehab rusty machines
« Reply #10 on: May 27, 2018, 01:10:12 PM »

Will try to remember next week, closed for the holidays. This is a community lab. Very well equipped and large but manned,and maintained by volunteers.

I've been a handyman for over 40 years and try to have a "preventive maintenance" attitude. I'm a "fixer" more than a "replacer".
There's a large lap (24"), and large and smaller wet belt sanders that I would like to start with . The sanders have aluminum water trays that have gotten pretty well corroded, but the lap is heavy steel . 
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lapidaryrough

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Re: What materials to use for rehab rusty machines
« Reply #11 on: May 27, 2018, 07:45:00 PM »

  And I lazy Me / copy paste


Rust removal

Phosphoric acid may be used to remove rust by direct application to rusted iron, steel tools, or other surfaces. The phosphoric acid changes the reddish-brown iron(III) oxide, Fe2O3 (rust), to ferric phosphate, FePO4. An empirical formula for this reaction is

    2 H3PO4 + Fe2O3 → 2 FePO4 + 3 H2O

Liquid phosphoric acid may be used for dipping, but phosphoric acid for rust removal is more often formulated as a gel. As a thick gel, it may be applied to sloping, vertical, or even overhead surfaces. Different phosphoric acid gel formulations are sold as "rust removers" or "rust killers". Multiple applications of phosphoric acid may be required to convert all rust. Rust may also be removed by phosphate conversion coating. This process can leave a black phosphate coating that provides moderate corrosion resistance (such protection is also provided by the superficially similar Parkerizing and blued electrochemical conversion coating processes).




  Soak all parts, clean as needed then wash with thinner that is used for the coating,   used.
   
  As for paint in the tank, At coolant level is the paint line that was their for the sale of the saw.

 Though i use Chevron Shingle oil NOW. Flash point 351 degrees F.

 in past Kerosene an No. 2 stove oil mix.

 And yes BBQ rock sometimes.

  Industrial grade enamel paint is best. Any thick coating you well not care for later.

   From my life of Painting, of all coatings...........Jack

 
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