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Author Topic: Speaking of Patinas  (Read 2154 times)

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Kaljaia

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Speaking of Patinas
« on: May 09, 2016, 12:05:47 PM »

A broken stone found in a ditch beside a road.





Very distinct difference in patina between sides. Flat grinder, I think? It was in a pretty clearly disturbed area and looked like it had been driven over, so not of historical value- well displaced from whatever location and strata it would have come from.
As to the patina, I am curious to know how many strokes it would take to polish and shine a stone that much. Would a good grinding stone be carried from camp to camp? Passed down from one generation to the next? Were they 'seasoned' by use and considered more valuable the smoother they got, or less effective as the rough surface wore off?

Or is it just the result of natural weathering?
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- Erika

I rock hunt in the Antelope/Ashwood area of the John Day river basin in Oregon. 90% of what I post is from this area, from private property where I have permission to hike and collect. The material I find is for personal use only, I do not have landowner permission to sell. Thanks for understanding!

Enchantra

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Re: Speaking of Patinas
« Reply #1 on: May 09, 2016, 12:16:25 PM »

I am going to say this is a product of weathering.  One side more exposed than the other.
My archaeological knowledge from studying Native artifacts in college and grad school tells me this is not man made.
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Kaljaia

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Re: Speaking of Patinas
« Reply #2 on: May 09, 2016, 12:35:13 PM »

I am going to say this is a product of weathering.  One side more exposed than the other.
My archaeological knowledge from studying Native artifacts in college and grad school tells me this is not man made.

Thanks for the response! I'll compare it to other local rock and see if the patina is replicated, maybe from a local wildfire. The road is not traveled enough for it to be 'cobblestone' wear. Would water produce such an uneven effect? 
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- Erika

I rock hunt in the Antelope/Ashwood area of the John Day river basin in Oregon. 90% of what I post is from this area, from private property where I have permission to hike and collect. The material I find is for personal use only, I do not have landowner permission to sell. Thanks for understanding!

lithicbeads

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Re: Speaking of Patinas
« Reply #3 on: May 09, 2016, 01:10:01 PM »

I assume there was a photo with this post but it is not showing for me.
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Kaljaia

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Re: Speaking of Patinas
« Reply #4 on: May 09, 2016, 01:48:19 PM »

I assume there was a photo with this post but it is not showing for me.

Thanks for letting me know! I swapped image hosting. Do they show up now?
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- Erika

I rock hunt in the Antelope/Ashwood area of the John Day river basin in Oregon. 90% of what I post is from this area, from private property where I have permission to hike and collect. The material I find is for personal use only, I do not have landowner permission to sell. Thanks for understanding!

lithicbeads

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Re: Speaking of Patinas
« Reply #5 on: May 09, 2016, 05:48:11 PM »

Yes and the stone looks extremely well worn. I suspect just a few years could do that because the stone they ground on became worn as well. All the grit was not good for the teeth at all.
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brentnewton

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Re: Speaking of Patinas
« Reply #6 on: Today at 03:35:21 PM »

Geological time is vast :) It strains the mind to understand.  Its not a man-made artifact .. its an artifact of time.  Vast time ... deep time. Most cobbles .. have been worked a lot of times. Over and over. And .. over.  I am in KY and have a ... serious interest in Pennsylvanian fluvial conglomerates .... lol.  Um ... think about 300 million year ago. I look at a cobbles and wonder where the hell in half a freaking continent it came from - if the continents were anywhere near where the a now (not) ... its a bit of a puzzle .. ok .. more than a bit of a puzzle.  Sure as heck ... ain't man made ya know .... just my thing ya know.  The continents were no where close to where they were ... mountains were .. nothing like are now .. deep time ... and we didn't talk about environments or atmosphere yea now.  Climate change meh ....
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