Lapidaryforum.net

Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
Advanced search  

News:

Welcome new members & old from the Lapidary/Gemstone Community Forum. Please join up. You will be approved after spam check & you must manually activate your acct with the link in your email

Congratulations to auscarver and his Rhodonite Cab!

 www.lapidaryforum.net

Another cabochon contest coming soon!

Pages: [1]   Go Down

Author Topic: Managing and Cleaning Stone Dust  (Read 403 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Michael

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 98
Managing and Cleaning Stone Dust
« on: October 26, 2018, 11:50:01 AM »

From just my experience, stone dust is one of those things you cannot completely clean or manage.  I always wear a 3M respirator when grinding, sanding and polishing and cleaning.  I use a sponge and bucket to clean the stone dust off with water.  Do any of the members of use any other sort of agent or tool?  When I do a bunch of cabs, I scrape it a putty knife into a small pile.  I have a cheap shop vac which i use to suck up the excess when I can, then wipe it down.  When I think I have it good and clean, the residue returns to tell me that it remains. 

I think it is almost impossible to get it completely clean.  I live in AZ, so the dry weather also may be a contributor.  Just reaching out to see if anyone has different, better, or anything they use differently to keep the dust under control?
Logged


bobby1

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 193
Re: Managing and Cleaning Stone Dust
« Reply #1 on: October 26, 2018, 02:15:40 PM »

What are you doing to create so much stone dust?
Bob
Logged

55fossil

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Online Online
  • Posts: 629
Re: Managing and Cleaning Stone Dust
« Reply #2 on: October 26, 2018, 06:28:02 PM »

   Yep, dust is a problem.  Water is only a partial help.. think about the following.

    I work on a dozen or so cabs at a time on my genie. The water spits a mist and has to be replaced as it dissipates in the air. The table top, lamp and anything close by get misted. When the mist evaporates there is a layer of super fine dust left on everything nearby. This dust is the dangerous stuff that will get in your lungs, even when using a wet system. Not everything stays in the tray or drip system if you use cascaded buckets. Yes, there is a huge pile of rock waste in the Genie water tray but much of the finest powder escapes in the mist.

     I use a hepa filter on my vacuum. I also wear a big clunky 3M face filter. With my hairy face I found the little masks were not catching enough. Also, the side filters on the 3M keep my optics from fogging up when I grind away. Probably not a big risk for healthy people. But those of us that smoked for 30 years or have medical problems like COPD it can be a risk. Common sense should prevail.....

Logged

lithicbeads

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 2525
Re: Managing and Cleaning Stone Dust
« Reply #3 on: October 27, 2018, 11:27:58 AM »

Get rid of the vacuum it makes the dust much more of a problem by putting it into the air.Wet mop only.Ceramic studio rules are a very good start as they have a basis in science since university ceramic programs  have studied the problem extensively.The major problem after using wet techniques to clean the shop is to try to keep the dust out of living areas where others family members can be affected. This is largely a problem of bringing the dust in on clothes and shoes.Miners never wear their work clothes home neither should we.
Logged

55fossil

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Online Online
  • Posts: 629
Re: Managing and Cleaning Stone Dust
« Reply #4 on: October 28, 2018, 10:09:43 AM »

     I have to disagree about vacuums. I have an air tight shop unless I open the window or door. I use a Hepa Vacuum with multiple filters and a Hepa bag as well. If you put a wet cloth over the exhaust there is nothing there after vacuuming the dust in my shop. Yes, a wet mop is great but it will not get every nook and cranny, etc.   So a Hepa certified vacuum is a must have in my shop.

    I do wipe down my tables and equipment with a wet hand held cloth after I have worked. I have a sink so I can deal with the wet clean-up but will never get rid of my Hepa as I also have carpeted mats for comfort at my work stations.
Logged
Pages: [1]   Go Up
 

Page created in 0.066 seconds with 33 queries.