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Author Topic: Nevada's wild horses (pic heavy)  (Read 193 times)

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VegasJames

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Nevada's wild horses (pic heavy)
« on: December 16, 2018, 11:33:58 PM »

I enjoy seeing our wild horses around here, what is left of them. BLM has been rounding up the horses in CLEAR violation of Federal Law using bogus excuses claiming they are starving or lack water. AS we can see they are far from starving and water is more than abundant for them here in Southern Nevada other than the water holes BLM has been fencing off to make sure the horses cannot access the water.  Many of the horses have died as the result of these round ups and recently BLM shot some wild horses on a private wild horse preserve claiming this was because they were in bad shape with no proof whatsoever. Then the drug the corpses off to try and hide the evidence.  Some of these horses have since been rounded up since I took these photos.

Unfortunately the media when they run the story of the horse rounds ups they help with the BLM's illegal activities by showing starving horses in their story videos to portray the BLM really has to round up these horses for their own good. As we can see these horses except the one are from the skinny, bones showing horses the media is showing in their clips showing we can't trust the media or the BLM.

The leader of one herd:

Herd 1-1 by James Sloane, on Flickr

DSC_0838 by James Sloane, on Flickr

DSC_0828 by James Sloane, on Flickr

DSC_0825 by James Sloane, on Flickr



DSC_0837 by James Sloane, on Flickr

DSC_0834 by James Sloane, on Flickr

DSC_0831 by James Sloane, on Flickr

DSC_0829 by James Sloane, on Flickr

DSC_0826 by James Sloane, on Flickr

DSC_0800 by James Sloane, on Flickr

DSC_0782 by James Sloane, on Flickr

DSC_0775 by James Sloane, on Flickr

DSC_0773 by James Sloane, on Flickr

DSC_0770 by James Sloane, on Flickr

DSC_0766 by James Sloane, on Flickr

DSC_0765 by James Sloane, on Flickr



The only reason this mare is thin is she recently gave birth. You can see her colt below her.

DSC_0799 by James Sloane, on Flickr

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lithicbeads

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Re: Nevada's wild horses (pic heavy)
« Reply #2 on: December 17, 2018, 08:37:27 AM »

A friend rented a house outside Silver Springs Nevada last week and had 5 wild horses walk through. Your story reminded me of many years ago when I lived in Yosemite. We walked out the Wawona tunnel one day to an access portal that went from the  road tunnel in a head high tunnel to an opening in the cliff face .We were going to rappel from the opening to the ground and then find a route to climb back up to the opening of the portal.The stench stopped us.There was a big pile of rotting bears on the ground below the portal opening. Apparently when the park service said they were relocating bears from the valley  they meant dead ones while everyone else thought they were being released to the back country.Wild horses are competitors for resources and may have to be managed to a degree but as always they are making policy in the field on the fly with no oversight or scientific justification.
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Orrum

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Re: Nevada's wild horses (pic heavy)
« Reply #3 on: December 17, 2018, 08:42:14 AM »

The bald faced horse in the 7th picture is not a mustang, my opinion. Long neck, high withers, excellant slope to the shoulders, strong rear quarter with a lot of distance from the hip caps to the pin bones, real fine textured hair. Domestic horse turned loose or got loose is my guess. Ranchers let the saddle stock roam loose on the range and the intermix but usually are easy to catch up. Shake a feed bag and the wild bunch run away and the ranch horses run to you!!!   Food is near to their heart. That bald faced horse is welcome on my ranch!!!
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