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Author Topic: Heavy metals from carving  (Read 1520 times)

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Kaljaia

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Heavy metals from carving
« on: December 18, 2018, 11:20:29 PM »

Saw this article today: https://torontolife.com/city/life/my-beautiful-death/
Thought the warning about carving materials with unknown heavy metal concentrations might have application to the lapidary community as well. I know shells, like bone and rock, are one of those things you don't ever want to breathe dust from but I'm not sure if a standard dust mask would have helped in her case. Regardless of how a toxin got to where it is, probably not a good idea to ingest or inhale it! Toxic art supplies are nothing new, but I can see how someone might not suspect seashells for heavy metal concentration.
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- Erika

I rock hunt in the Antelope/Ashwood area of the John Day river basin in Oregon. 90% of what I post is from this area, from private property where I have permission to hike and collect. The material I find is for personal use only, I do not have landowner permission to sell. Thanks for understanding!

lithicbeads

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Re: Heavy metals from carving
« Reply #1 on: December 19, 2018, 08:47:53 AM »

Animals and plants use heavy metal concentrations in their war against predators.  Tree bark is a prime example as it is loaded with human  -insect poisons. Remarkably tee bark from  saw mills has long been used in a chipped fermented  " soup " form to feed beef cows .It was just a few years ago that this practice was stopped.
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55fossil

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Re: Heavy metals from carving
« Reply #2 on: December 19, 2018, 05:25:59 PM »

   The first post is dead on. Best to just be over cautious but not crazy.  As for tree bark;  some is good, others are bad.  Aspirin comes to mind.  But I think I would prefer grass fed beef.
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