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Author Topic: Oregon pet wood  (Read 195 times)

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Stonemon

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Oregon pet wood
« on: May 09, 2019, 05:35:11 PM »

A friend has been collecting for years but does not have equipment to work any of it.
He brought a couple of pieces up last week and I put them in the Frantom.
Polished them with Richardson style high speed sander.
The dark one has square holes after halite, salt bog wood from the mid Willamette valley.
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Bill

Ryaly2dogs

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Re: Oregon pet wood
« Reply #1 on: May 09, 2019, 05:50:43 PM »

Wow, those are gorgeous!   :drool:

Really nice work that will bring a huge smile to your friend's face.  I have some other "pitted" Oregon pet wood slices that I will need to take another look at because your "holes after halite" comment struck a chord; is that common for Oregon pet wood?  Is the first one perhaps a cherry wood?  Also, what "grit" was your final touch on these beauties?  Thanks for sharing.
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Stonemon

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Re: Oregon pet wood
« Reply #2 on: May 09, 2019, 06:18:55 PM »

I don't know the variety on these. My academic adviser at the U of O was professor Bill Orr and he explained the odd shaped holes in class one day.
I guess it is fairly common in the mid Willamette valley. Not sure how widespread.
I started sanding at 40 grit then 60, 120, 240, 320, 400, 600, 800, and ended at 1000. Then on to a felt pad loaded with 50,000 diamond paste.
The lighter colored one took a nice matte to low gloss finish, very tactile while the darker one took a higher shine but is quite different to feel...
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Bill

Kaljaia

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Re: Oregon pet wood
« Reply #3 on: May 09, 2019, 08:07:42 PM »

Both are lovely wood. The top one especially, it still retains the natural "character" of the wood. The matte finish I think helps, it's not so glossy that the reflection distracts from the texture.
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- Erika

I rock hunt in the Antelope/Ashwood area of the John Day river basin in Oregon. 90% of what I post is from this area, from private property where I have permission to hike and collect. The material I find is for personal use only, I do not have landowner permission to sell. Thanks for understanding!

irockhound

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Re: Oregon pet wood
« Reply #4 on: May 09, 2019, 10:36:23 PM »

That big slab must have been fun to hold up against the richardsons sander.  That thing catches an edge it would kill someone.
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Stonemon

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Re: Oregon pet wood
« Reply #5 on: May 10, 2019, 06:11:34 AM »

That big slab must have been fun to hold up against the richardsons sander.  That thing catches an edge it would kill someone.

I always work at an angle sanding off the trailing edge. As Clint Eastwood said, "Dying is no way to make a living."
I caught a small one once and have been very intentional since then. :shocked:
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Bill

lithicbeads

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Re: Oregon pet wood
« Reply #6 on: May 10, 2019, 08:35:14 AM »

Nice work , good advice. Having seen people die at work  that quote is very meaningful to me.My Dad was  a roof bolter in a mine and one day he told his crew to abandon the drift they were working in and go to a different level.During their extended lunch most of the drift they had been working in collapsed.I worked lots of dangerous jobs and never thought  that the risk of  dying at work made sense for what we were getting paid.
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